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The Helping Our Toddlers Developing Our Children’s Skills (HOT DOCS) program is a parent-training program that was developed with funding through the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County (CBHC), and since 2006 has served over 2000 families of children 5 years and younger. A pilot open trial is currently underway with Australian families with promising initial findings.

HOT DOCS References:

Agazzi, H., Childres, J., & Armstrong, K. (2017). Helping Our Toddlers, Developing Our Children’s Skills – Trainer’s Manual, 3rd Edition Revised. Florida, USA: University of South Florida.

Agazzi, H., Salinas, A., Williams, J., Chiriboga, D., Ortiz, C., & Armstrong, K. (2010). Adaptation of a behavioral parent‐training curriculum for Hispanic caregivers: HOT DOCS Español. Infant Mental Health Journal: Official Publication of The World Association for Infant Mental Health, 31(2), 182-200.

Armstrong, K., Lilly, C., Agazzi, H., & Williams, J. (2010). HOT DOCS: Helping Our Toddlers Developing Our Children’s Skills Provider Manual Tampa. FL: University of South Florida.

Armstrong, K., Lilly, C., & Curtiss, H. (2006). Helping our toddlers developing our children’s skills. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Child Development.

Armstrong, K., Missall, K. N., Shaffer, E., & Hojnoski, R. L. (2009). Promoting positive adaptation during the early childhood years. Handbook of Positive Psychology in Schools, 339-352.

Childres, J. L., Agazzi, H., & Armstrong, K. (2011). Evaluating outcomes of a behavioral parent training program for caregivers of young children: Waitlist control vs. immediate treatment. Journal of Early Childhood & Infant Psychology, 7, 25-44.

Childres, J. L., Shaffer-Hudkins, E., & Armstrong, K. (2012). Helping our toddlers, developing our children’s skills (HOT DOCS): A problem-solving approach for parents of young children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 34(6), S9-S10.

Curtiss, H., Armstrong, K., & Lilly, C. (2008). Positive behavior supports and pediatric feeding disorders of early childhood: a case study. Journal of Early Childhood and Infant Psychology, 4, 93-110.

Hofmann Leedy, N. A. (2018). Parent perceptions of treatment effectiveness and attendance rates in a behavioral parent training program: Do they predict treatment outcomes for children?(10603620). Available from Dissertations & Theses @ University of South Florida – FCLA; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1946185603). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1946185603?accountid=14745

Jordan-Arthur, B. (2018). The role of fathers in behavioral parent training: An exploration of parent-related factors in parent and child treatment outcomes (10838599). Available from Dissertations & Theses @ University of South Florida – FCLA; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (2094708296). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/2094708296?accountid=14745

Ogg, J. Shaffer-Hudkins, E., Childres, J., Feldman, M., Agazzi, H., & Armstrong, K. (2014) Attendance and implementation of strategies in a behavioral parent-training program: Comparisons between English and Espanol programs. Infant Mental Health Journal, 35(6), 555-564.

Patenaude, A. H. S. (2011). An examination of demographic variables and their relationships with perceived stress among caregivers beginning a parent training program (1497390). Available from Dissertations & Theses @ University of South Florida – FCLA; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (885422929). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/885422929?accountid=14745

Salinas, A., Smith, J. C., & Armstrong, K. (2011). Engaging fathers in behavioral parent training: listening to fathers’ voices. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 26(4), 304-311.

Williams, J. L. (2007). Caregivers perceptions of the effectiveness of the Helping Our Toddlers, Developing Our Children’s Skills parent training program: A pilot study. Graduate Theses and Dissertations. http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/2411

Williams, J. L. (2009). Helping our toddlers, developing our children’s skills (HOT DOCS): An investigation of a parenting program to address challenging behavior in young children (3420529). Available from Dissertations & Theses @ University of South Florida – FCLA; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (749943937). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/749943937?accountid=14745

Williams, J. L. (2009). Helping our toddlers, developing our children’s skills (HOT DOCS): An investigation of a parenting program to address challenging behavior in young children. Graduate Theses and Dissertations. http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/86

Williams, J., Armstrong, K. H., Agazzi, H., & Bradley-Klug, K. L. (2010). Helping our toddlers, developing our children’s skills (HOT DOCS): A parenting intervention to prevent and address challenging behavior in young children. Journal of Early Childhood and Infant Psychology, 6, 1-20.